Welcome To Sneckie Taxis 01463 611 111

 

WELCOME TO SNECKIE TAXIS INVERNESS 01463 611 111

 

WELCOME TO SNECKIE TAXIS, YOUR LOCAL FRIENDLY TAXI COMPANY IN INVERNESS. AS WELL AS A RELIABLE 24 HOUR TAXI SERVICE WE ALSO OFFER CONTRACT SERVICES, PRIVATE TOURS, AIRPORT & SCHOOL RUNS AS WELL AS EXECUTIVE AND CORPORATE HIRE.

 

 

 

 

 

SERVING THE CITY OF INVERNESS AND SURROUNDING AREA

 

DISTANCE NO OBJECT – PLEASE CALL US WITH YOUR REQUIREMENTS

 

 

 

 

 

Airport Transfers

Flying from Inverness airport? Take the stress out of your journey with our prompt airport drop-off & collection service.

1611

CALL 01463 611 111 TO ARRANGE YOUR AIRPORT SERVICE

PROMPT & RELIABLE SERVICE

Inverness airport Taxi – Example fares

INVERNESS AIRPORT TO THE FOLLOWING DESTINATIONSDAY & EVENING FARES

INVERNESS CITY £15 / £20 | ULLAPOOL £92 / £124 | DINGWALL £33 / £44 | ELGIN £46 / £62 | THURSO £165 / £225

 

Prices are based on up to 4 passengers. PSV vehicles available on request.
Fares will differ from Monday to Friday 21.00 to 07.00 and all day Saturday & Sunday due to tariff change.

Private Tours

Enjoy the luxury of a private tour by Sneckie Taxis, Inverness

Example destinations below or build your own tour from £35 per hour

Loch Ness & Urquhart Castle

Loch Ness, Scotland

Loch Ness, Scotland

Loch Ness is the second largest Scottish loch by surface area at 22 sq mi (56 km2) after Loch Lomond, but due to its great depth, it is the largest by volume. Its deepest point is 755 ft (230 m), making it the second deepest loch in Scotland after Loch Morar. It contains more fresh water than all the lakes in England and Wales combined,[3] and is the largest body of water on the Great Glen Fault, which runs from Inverness in the north to Fort William in the south.

The Loch Ness Monster reputedly inhabits Loch Ness in the Scottish Highlands.

It is similar to other supposed monsters in Scotland and elsewhere, though its description varies from one account to the next, with most describing it as large. Popular interest and belief in the creature’s existence has varied since it was first brought to the world’s attention in 1933. Evidence of its existence is anecdotal, with minimal and much-disputed photographic material and sonar readings.

The most common speculation among believers is that the creature represents a line of long-surviving plesiosaurs.[5] Much of the scientific community regards the Loch Ness Monster as a modern-day myth, and explains sightings as including misidentifications of more mundane objects, outright hoaxes, and wishful thinking. Despite this, it remains one of the most famous examples of cryptozoology.

The creature has been affectionately referred to by the nickname Nessie.

Fort Augustus & The Caledonian Canal

Fort Augustus

Fort Augustus

The Gaelic name for the modern village is Cill Chuimein and until the early 18th century the settlement was called Kiliwhimin. It was renamed ‘Fort Augustus’ after the Jacobite Rising of 1715. The accepted etymology is that the settlement was originally named after Saint Cummein of Iona who built a church there. Other suggestions are that it was originally called Ku Chuimein after one of two abbots of Iona of the Comyn clan, whose badge Lus mhic Chuimein refers to the cumin plant, or that it was called Cill a’ Chuimein (“Comyn’s Burialplace”) after the last Comyn in Lochaber.

In the aftermath of the Jacobite rising in 1715, General Wade built a fort (taking from 1729 until 1742) which was named after the Duke of Cumberland. Wade had planned to build a town around the new barracks and call it Wadesburgh. The settlement grew, and eventually took the name of this fort. The fort was captured by the Jacobites in April 1745, just prior to the Battle of Culloden.

In 1867, the fort was sold to the Lovat family, and in 1876 they passed the site and land to the Benedictine order. The monks established Fort Augustus Abbey and later a school. The school operated until 1993 when it closed owing to changing educational patterns in Scotland causing a decline in enrollment. In 1998 the monks abandoned the site, and it reverted to the Lovat family which in turn sold it to Terry Nutkins. He also owned the Lovat Hotel[8] that stands on the site of the old Kilwhimen Barracks, one of four built in 1718. This site houses the west curtain wall of the old Fort, intact with gun embrasures.

Cawdor Castle

Cawdor Castle

Cawdor Castle

Cawdor Castle is set amid gardens in the parish of Cawdor, approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of Inverness and 5 miles (8.0 km) southwest of Nairn in Scotland. The castle is built around a 15th-century tower house, with substantial additions in later centuries. Originally a property of the Clan Calder, it passed to the Campbells in the 16th century. It remains in Campbell ownership, and is now home to the Dowager Countess Cawdor, stepmother of Colin Campbell, 7th Earl Cawdor.

The castle is perhaps best known for its literary connection to William Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth, in which the title character is made “Thane of Cawdor”. However, the story is highly fictionalised, and the castle itself, which is never directly referred to in Macbeth, was built many years after the life of the 11th-century King Macbeth.

The castle is a category A listed building and the grounds are included in the Inventory of Gardens and Designed Landscapes in Scotland, the national listing of significant gardens.

One curious feature of the castle is that it was built around a small, living holly tree. Tradition states that a donkey, laden with gold, lay down to rest under this tree, which was then selected as the site of the castle. The remains of the tree may still be seen in the lowest level of the tower. Modern scientific testing has shown that the tree died in approximately 1372 lending credence to the earlier date of the castle’s first construction. The iron yett (gate) here was brought from nearby Lochindorb Castle which was dismantled by William around 1455, on the orders of King James II, after it had been forfeited by the Earl of Moray.

Culloden Battlefield

Culloden Battlefield

Culloden Battlefield

The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745 and part of a religious civil war in Britain. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart fought loyalist troops commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands. Queen Anne had died in 1714 without any surviving children and was the last monarch of the House of Stuart. Under the terms of the Act of Settlement 1701, she was succeeded by her second cousin George I of the House of Hanover, who was a descendant of the Stuarts through his maternal grandmother, Elizabeth, a daughter of James VI and I. The Hanoverian victory at Culloden halted the Jacobite intent to overthrow the House of Hanover and restore the House of Stuart to the British throne; Charles Stuart never again mounted any further attempts to challenge Hanoverian power in Great Britain. The conflict was the last pitched battle fought on British soil.

Between 1,500 and 2,000 Jacobites were killed or wounded in the brief battle. Government losses were lighter with 50 dead and 259 wounded although recent geophysical studies on the government burial pit suggest the figure to be nearer 300.[citation needed] The battle and its aftermath continue to arouse strong feelings: the University of Glasgow awarded Cumberland an honorary doctorate, but many modern commentators allege that the aftermath of the battle and subsequent crackdown on Jacobitism were brutal, and earned Cumberland the sobriquet “Butcher”. Efforts were subsequently taken to further integrate the comparatively wild Highlands into the Kingdom of Great Britain; civil penalties were introduced to weaken Gaelic culture and attack the Scottish clan system.

Castle Stuart & Golf

Castle Stuart

Castle Stuart

History and diversity make Scottish golf courses famous throughout the world. As Turnberry is to Ayrshire and Gleneagles is to Perthshire, Castle Stuart has been conceived to be for the Highlands – a beacon reaching out to golfers throughout the world. The centrepiece for this Scottish destination golf resort is Castle Stuart Golf Links, a championship links course overlooking the Moray Firth and well-known landmarks that are synonymous with Inverness and the Black Isle – Kessock Bridge and Chanonry Lighthouse perhaps the most notable. The resort will include a bespoke Golf Hotel, a small luxury Hotel & Spa, ‘resort-ownership’ Lodges & Apartments, plus a second Seaside Course. Castle Stuart’s goal is to add to the rich fabric of golf in the Scottish Highlands – a fabric made rich by Royal Dornoch, Nairn, Brora, and many other fine Scottish golf clubs.

Many links courses are known for their uneven or ‘rumpled’ fairways. Fairways can be flat in areas and ‘rumpled’ in others with differences in ‘lie and stance’ of tactical significance. Greenside rumple can disturb the release of an approach to a ‘short pin’ from certain angles. ‘Rumple’ is inherent to the charm of links golf that Castle Stuart embraces.

There are significant differences among links courses – in topography, sea views, fairway contours, bunker styles, green complexes, landscape mosaic, and even the smallest of course details, e.g. path and step details. Distinctive Course Features is a photographic journey with text and music that highlights Castle Stuart’s distinctive character in the world of links golf.

Our Taxi Rates

Our taxi rates are defined by The Highland Council. Details of all the rates can be found on the Highland Council website by following the link below.

Highland Council Taxi Fares

EXAMPLE DAYTIME TAXI FARES:
Inverness to Beauly £21.00 | Inverness to Golspie £70.00 | Inverness to Aviemore £45.00 | Inverness to Dundee £190.00

If you need a quote before a journey or a bespoke quote for a private tour or longer distance run, please contact us for more information.



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